ANXIETY TREATMENT

NeuroCes

If you have a feeling of apprehension, uncertainty or fear, the NeuroCes™ Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulator reduces these anxiety symptoms in a spectacular way with no significant side effects. The NeuroCes™ technology that provides an effective drug-free way to treat anxiety is proven, safe and effective.

NeuroCes™ treatment results are cumulative and lasting. While most of the users experience improvement immediately in the course of treatment; others experience in hours, or several days after.

ANXIETY
improvement range
31% - 97%

As of now, there have been at least 38 anxiety studies published, with an average 58% improvement.  The improvement found in various studies has ranged from 31% to 97%. This is thought to be very important in that anxiety is thought to underlie as much as 90% of illnesses seen by medical practitioners.  Again, the results are as good as that obtained with pharmaceutical medications, is less expensive over time, and has none of the very negative side effects of some medications [1].

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In terms of psychiatric diagnosis, “anxiety” is typically associated with specific disorders. Current psychiatric diagnosis is outlined in the DSM-IV [2].

Anxiety is a feeling of apprehension, uncertainty and fear without apparent stimulus, and associated with physiological changes (tachycardia, sweating, tremor, etc.) [3].

Anxiety Disorders represent a phenomenologically heterogeneous group of disorders, which include: generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder (with and without agoraphobia), phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and acute stress disorder. Anxiety as it is commonly thought of is most often associated with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) [4].

[1] Ray B. Smith, Ph. D.(2007). Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation: It’s First Fifty Years, Plus Three: A Monograph. ISBN: 978-1-60247-589-2  & Cranial Electrotherapy Stimulation Lecture.

[2] American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Association, 1994.

[3] Dorland’s Illustrated Medical Dictionary, 26th edition. Philadelphia, WB Saunders, 1985, p. 96. 

[4] American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Association, 1994, p. 432-433.